Easter at @rockharborchurch  (at Verizon Wireless Amphitheater) High-res

Easter at @rockharborchurch (at Verizon Wireless Amphitheater)

Blog Widget by LinkWithin
Dying the #eastereggs. High-res

Dying the #eastereggs.

Blog Widget by LinkWithin
Trying to get back in the habit of running every day. If I make this my destination, I’m more motivated. (at Lifeguard Tower 68) High-res

Trying to get back in the habit of running every day. If I make this my destination, I’m more motivated. (at Lifeguard Tower 68)

Blog Widget by LinkWithin

By framing the conversation about motherhood in “choice,” we aren’t talking about any of the very real problems faced by parents and children across this country. We aren’t talking about the number of children in foster care (nearly 400,000) or growing up in poverty (22% of American children). We aren’t talking about lack of education and employment opportunities for women in general and women of color in particular. We aren’t talking about the fact that the United States has the worst parental leave policies in the industrialized world; wouldn’t it be nice if women could chose to go back to work after several months (or years, what’s up Estonia!), instead of just a few scant weeks if they’re lucky enough to get even that? We aren’t talking about the wage gap and how it impacts the choices that couples have to make about who stays home (if anyone). There is no way to quantify the work that mothers do, stay at home or working. They are not CEOs. They are not employees. They are so much more than that, and they deserve a real conversation about how to make motherhood a choice, stay at home motherhood a choice, and working motherhood a choice, instead of what it too often is: a necessity born of a number of variables, and not real choice at all.

Blog Widget by LinkWithin

Have you guys seen this app? Karis stayed the night at grandma’s and they made this. Cracking me up. @nancyhowerton

Blog Widget by LinkWithin

For Asian Americans, killing the myth requires destroying the veil of elevated expectations and assumptions that surround us to reveal the real face of our richly diverse communities and experiences. I call it model minority suicide. Need convincing? Here are five reasons:

Blog Widget by LinkWithin

And this is where it becomes uncomfortable. The Zionist settlers attributed the desert-like qualities of the land to the apparent neglect of the Arab dwellers. This neglect of the land, because of the absence of true Israelis to care for it, validated the Zionist position of resettlement. Zerubavel reminds us of Yitzhak Ben-Zvi, 2nd Israeli President, and his opinion that “the cultivated land became a desert as a result of the Jews’ forced exile and the subsequent inhabitants’ limited means and negligence” (205). Suddenly, the formation of Israel is more than just the reestablishment of an ancient homeland; it is the reinstitution of the “real” inhabitants because those who have resided in the land are “inadequate.” These spatial qualities of desert and settlement became endued with a militaristic and national aura, heightening the sense of survival amidst the threatening presence of the “desert” Arabs.

Blog Widget by LinkWithin

BELLE Featurette: The Cast (by FoxSearchlight)

Blog Widget by LinkWithin

Jill and Kate’s awesome acoustic cover of Baby One More Time (Britney Spears) (by Jill and Kate)

Blog Widget by LinkWithin


 
     


 

 

 



 

 

 


Tags

Pin It
View My Stats